Carb Bingeing Could Be Yeast Craving

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Trick or Treat?

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Your body is playing tricks on you when it craves something you are trying to avoid. Candida yeast, present in everyone’s gut, can grow out of proportion if you consume too much sugar. When this happens, you feel tired and lose concentration.

Various carbohydrates convert to glucose (sugar) at different rates according to a glycemic index. Carbs lacking fiber convert quicker. When you have too much Candida, you crave even more sugar.

Why So Much Yeast?

The increasing and widespread use of certain medical practices, such as immuno­suppressive therapies, invasive surgical procedures, and use of broad-spectrum antibiotics contributes to Candida pathogens. Of over 150 Candida genus species, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis and C. parapsilosis frequently thrive within human hosts.

How can you crave something harmful? You open a bag of potato chips, box of chocolate, pint of ice cream, or bottle of beer. (Insert your own guilty pleasure here.) One bite or sip turns to two. Before you know it, you are in binge mode. Fatigue follows your initial burst of energy.

After some rest, you awaken with a strong appetite. Holding an open refrig­era­tor door handle in your hand, everything you focus on is either a simple carbohydrate or sugar. The craving can extend for hours or days as you keep building up more yeast.

The yeast wants more sugar to proliferate. As it does, it spreads to other parts of your body. This causes skin problems, athletes foot, nail fungus, vaginal yeast infections, and oral thrush. Over-the-counter or prescription yeast remedies can reduce abnormal buildup. Probiotics can help you maintain proper gut flora balance.

Outsmart your yeasty gut with your shopping cart. Eat fibrous carbohydrates like celery, cabbage slaw, and leafy salads. It takes longer for your body to convert these to sugar. If you exert yourself afterwards—perhaps going for a vigorous walk—you can utilize the energy.

Stock up on foods with a low glycemic index (GI) so when the refrigerator door swings open, you combat cravings with healthy options.

List of Low GI Foods (20–49)

  • All Bran
  • Fruit’ n Oats
  • Fiber One
  • Oat Bran
  • Oatmeal (not instant)
  • Apple juice
  • Apples
  • Apricots
  • Blackberries
  • Blueberries
  • Cherries (not dried)
  • Cranberries
  • Grapefruit
  • Grapefruit juice
  • Peaches
  • Pears
  • Plums
  • Prunes
  • Raspberries
  • Strawberries
  • Tangerine
  • Tomato juice
  • Black eyed peas
  • Butter beans chick peas
  • Green beans
  • Kidney beans
  • Pinto beans
  • Lentils
  • Lima beans
  • Navy beans
  • Snow peas
  • Hummus
  • Artichoke
  • Asparagus
  • Avocado
  • Broccoli
  • Cabbage
  • Cauliflower
  • Celery
  • Cucumber
  • Eggplant
  • Greens
  • Lettuce
  • Mushrooms
  • Okra
  • Onions
  • Peppers
  • Spinach
  • Summer squash
  • Tomatoes
  • Turnips
  • Zucchini
  • Barley
  • Bulgur
  • Rye
  • Wheat pasta
  • Wheat tortilla
  • Wild rice
  • Almonds
  • Hazelnuts
  • Oils (liquid room temp)
  • Olives walnuts
  • Peanuts
  • Pecans
  • Sunflower seeds
  • Almond milk
  • Egg beaters
  • Egg whites
  • Egg yolks (≤3 week)
  • Fish
  • Lean red meat
  • Low-fat cheese
  • Shellfish
  • Skim milk
  • Chicken/turkey (skinless)
  • Soy milk
  • Soy products
  • Yogurt (low-fat or greek)

It is not just your gut that is enticing you with tasty food lacking adequate nutrition. Food manufacturers launch advertising campaigns that quell your desire to cook wholesome meals. They convince you that what is fast or easy takes precedence.

Don’t buy into the perception that deleterious meals offer benefits. Combat the urge to binge on yeast-proliferating foods. You will feel more alert and healthy.

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Kevin Williams is a health advocate, artist, pro­gram­mer, and writer of hundreds of articles for multiple web­sites. He has 17 years experi­ence as a Neutrogena Research and Scientific Affairs graphics con­sul­tant.

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