Prevent Misdirected Doctor Visits

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Many patients leave doctors’ offices with more questions than they brought.

Satisfying Consultations

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As a patient, do you some­times visit a medical doctor with baffling symptoms? You envision consider­able investiga­tion, en­lighten­ment and resolu­tion with your lengthy discus­sion. More likely than not, complex visits can leave you feeling a bit unsatisfied. With preparation and adjusted expectations, you can get on the same page as your physician.

Lower Your Expectations

Today’s medical doctors train to prescribe or refer as quickly as possible. To this end, medica­tion is often the primary remedy in their minds—pain relievers, statins, insulin, chemo­therapy, etc. Only after symptoms do not respond to medicine does a scalpel come out.

Diagnosis is secondary to symptom manage­ment. Patients who need a lengthy talk receive a psychiatrist referral. It is not an insult. It is a byproduct of the triage nature of individual consultations.

Prevent Misdirected Doctor Visits

Take Charge of Your Health

There are things we all can do to improve our health—even without medica­tion or surgery. Get back to the basics. The follow­ing things are not within a prescrip­tion bottle and cannot be cut from us with a scalpel:

  • Eat healthy foods. Bodies need constant nutrition for cognition, energy and cell management.
  • Exercise regularly. Strong muscles increase metabo­lism and reduce strain on joints and ligaments. Aim for 20 minutes of vigorous exercise five times per week.
  • Get enough sleep. Many biological repairs take place during rest periods.
  • Socialize with friends. Interacting with and helping others in positive ways releases pleasure hormones like serotonin.
  • Avoid destructive behaviors. Smoking, excessive drinking, and high-risk sports are likely to sent you to the doctor.

We need balance. With a healthy lifestyle, medical doctors or therapists are better equipped to assist within their respective range of specialties.

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Kevin Williams is a health advocate and writer of hundreds of articles for multiple web­sites, including: A Bit More Healthy, KevinMD (WebMD), and Sue’s Nutrition Buzz. He is a prior 15-year con­sul­tant for Neutrogena Research and Scientific Affairs.

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